Syllabus for Biology of Human Aging
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Why is this course valuable? Knowledge and understanding of human aging is important because aging affects social, psychological, economic, and other aspects of each person and the individuals with whom they interact. This importance is growing as aging affects society in more intense, complex and diverse ways. The growth in importance of aging stems from the increasing number of aging individuals now and well into the 21st century. Therefore, having knowledge and understanding of aging can be valuable personally and professionally now and far into the future.

 This course provides opportunities to learn about several aspects of biological aging. They include what it is; how it happens; what effects it has on the structure and operations of the human body; how it affects social, psychological and other aspects of life; how it is related to diseases; and what can or cannot be done about it.

Instructor: Dr. Augustine  G. DiGiovanna, Professor of Biology

Prerequisites: Biology 101 or both Biology 215 and Biology 216 (General Biology or Human Anatomy and Physiology)

Class meetings: Lecture - DH144 on TR, 12:30-1:45am

Text: Human Aging: Biological Perspectives by A. G. DiGiovanna, McGraw-Hill, Inc. (2000)

Course Credit: The three credits for Biol 219 apply toward Gen. Ed. Group IIIB, the minor in Biology, the minor in Gerontology, and the 120 credit graduation requirement.

Course Objectives: This course should enable students to:

  1. Demonstrate a knowledge of demographic information pertaining to aging and to the elderly in the United States and an understanding of the significance of these demographics.
  2. Name and describe factors that are believed to cause or influence the process of aging.
  3. List and describe theories of aging and explain the relationships among them.
  4. Describe, compare, and evaluate methods used to study aging.
  5. Define and describe the concept of homeostasis and explain its importance and how it is maintained.
  6. Describe the normal structure, functioning, and contributions to healthy survival of each body system in young adults.
  7. Describe age changes in each body system and the interactions among these systems in older adults.
  8. Describe certain abnormal changes both in body systems and the interactions among these systems in older adults.
  9. Describe interactions among biological, psychological, social, and economic factors in older adults.
10. Relate and use this knowledge their personal and professional lives.

These are general objectives, and most of them are taken from the preface for the text. Specific objectives for each section of the course will be presented during the course. It is expected that students will find the information needed to carry out most of the objectives by reading the text and taking notes from it. Class time will be used to answer questions, and to supplement and amplify the text with lectures, discussions, demonstrations, and video programs. Schedule: The course schedule is included in the separate schedule sheet.

Attendance: Attendance at classes is important because the educational experiences encountered in class cannot be obtained at any other place or time. Therefore, students are expected to attend all classes. Final grades will be adjusted downward based on the number of absences. No adjustment will be made for the first two absences, one/half point will be deducted for the third, 1.5 points will be deducted for four absences, and an additional two points will be deducted for each additional absence up to a total possible deduction of twenty points. In addition, students are responsible for all information, materials, assignments, and announcements presented in class. Students are required to have and use a campus Group Wise E-mail account for this course.

Examinations: Examinations will be based primarily on specific objectives derived from material in the text and augmented by lectures, other class activities, and other assignments. Exams will not be cumulative except for material that is repeated in objectives, text readings, lectures, or assignments. The point value for each exam will be proportional to the amount of material required for the exam.

Absence from an exam is a serious matter and could result in an exam grade of zero. Make-up exams will be given for serious reasons as judged by the instructor. Notifications and requests should be made before or on the day of the exam. The instructor should be contacted in person, by note, or by messenger at DH114 or through the departmental secretary (DX302), by phone (546-3488, 546-3490, 555-5555 {home}), or by E-mail (agdigiovanna@salisbury.edu). Grades of zero will be given for exams that are not taken or are not made up.

Non-Text Reading and Writing Assignments: Several specific reading assignments from references other than the text will be made. These reading assignments and their accompanying writing assignments are described on separate sheets.

Return to Reading and Writings assignments

Grading: Exam grades will make up 75% of the final grade. Grading will be based primarily on the accuracy and completeness of answers, but the quality of writing techniques used will also influence grading. The grades on Reading and Writing assignments will make up 25% of the final grade. Grading of reports will be based primarily upon content, completeness, and the student's demonstrated understanding of the material. Organization, clarity, neatness, use of proper writing techniques, following instructions, and meeting deadlines will also be considered in the grading of reports. No quotes or simple paraphrasing are acceptable. More details about grading written assignments are provided on separate sheets.

In unusual circumstances, a student's final grade may be increased or decreased by up to two points based on participation in class, timely completion of short assignments, and other subjective criteria such as cooperation and enthusiasm.

Special help: Individual help is available during regular office hours and at any other time of mutual agreement.

Office hours:  DX307   Phone: 543-6488 (office)   E-mail: agdigiovanna@salisbury.edu

       M               T               W               T                F

     10-11        11-12            1-2           11-12           10-11

Academic honesty: The university's policy on academic honesty as published in the university catalog and the Student Handbook is in effect at all times for all matters related to this course.

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Schedule for Biology of Human Aging

Instructor: Dr. Augustine DiGiovanna, Professor of Biology

Office: DX307    Phone: 543-6488   555-5555 (home)   E-mail: agdigiovanna@salisbury.edu

Text: Human Aging: Biological Perspectives, by A. G. DiGiovanna, McGraw-Hill, Inc. (2000)

This schedule is subject to change as deemed desirable by the instructor as circumstances warrant. Changes will be announced in class. Students are responsible for knowing of such changes whether or not they attend class.

Week

Date

Topic

Text
Chapter

Read/Write Due

 

 

 

 

 

  1

Jan. 28 Feb. 1

Introduction to Aging 

1-2

 

 

 

 

Feb. 1 - End of Drop/Add.

 

 

 

 

 

  2

Feb. 4-8

Integumentary System

3

1 - Feb. 7 (Thurs.)

 

 

 

 

 

  3

Feb. 11-15

Circulatory System

4

 

 

 

 

 

 

  4

Feb. 18-22

Respiratory System 

5

2 - Feb. 21 (Thurs.)

 

 

 

 

 

  5

Feb. 25 - Mar. 1

Nervous System

6

 

 

 

 

Thursday   Feb. 28  TEST 1 Chapters 1-4 

 

 

 

 

 

  6

Mar. 4-8

Eyes and Ears

7

3 - Mar. 7 (Thurs.)

 

 

 

 

 

  7

Mar. 11-15

Muscle System 

8

 

 

 

 

Thursday   Mar. 14  TEST 2 - Chapters 5-7

 

 

 

 

 

  8

Mar. 18-22

Skeletal System 

9

4 - Mar. 29 (Thurs.)

 

 

 

Mar. 25 29    S   P   R   I   N   G         V   A   C    T   I   O   N 

 

 

 

 

 

  9

Apr. 1-5 

Digestive System 

10

 

 

 

 

Apr. 5 - Last day for dropping with grade of W.

 

 

 

 

 

 10

Apr. 8-12

Diet and Nutrition 

11

5 - Apr. 12 (Thurs.)

 

 

 

 

 

 11

Apr. 15-19

Urinary System 

12

 

 

 

 

Thursday  Apr. 18  TEST 3 Chapters 8-11

 

 

 

 

 

 12

Apr. 22-26

Reproductive Systems

13

6 - Apr. 26 (Thurs. )

 

 

 

 

 

 13

Apr. 29 - May 3

Endocrine System 

14

 

 

 

 

 

 

 14

May 6-10

Endocrine System
Immunity 

14-15

7 & 8 - May 8 (Tues.)

 

 

 

 

 

 15

May 13-14

Immunity 

15

 

 

 

15-16

May 16 - 22  FINAL EXAM  Tuesday  May 21 -  10:15am-12:15pm or as published
                                                           in the exam schedule) - Chapters 12-15 

 

 

 

 

 

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©Copyright 2002 - Augustine G. DiGiovanna - All rights reserved.
This material may be reproduced or distributed in any form or by any means, or stored in any data base or retrieval system ONLY under one of the following two conditions: (1) If no individual, group, organization, institution, company, corporation or other entity is charged for its use and only for use by instructors and students in courses where students are required to purchase the book HUMAN AGING: BIOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVES by Augustine G. DiGiovanna, The McGraw-Hill Companies, New York, 1994 or 2000; (2) If prior written permission is obtained from Augustine G. DiGiovanna.